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July 13, 2024  British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP)  The BC PNP is a pathway for high-demand foreign workers and experienced entrepreneurs to gain permanent residence in British Columbia. The program is designed to attract skilled workers who can contribute to the province’s economic development.  July 2024 Second Draw Details  Date of Draw: Second draw of July 2024  Number of Invitations: 71  Categories and Streams  Skills Immigration (SI)  Skilled Worker  Healthcare Professional  International Graduate  Entry Level and Semi-Skilled Worker  Post-Graduate Express Entry BC (EEBC)  Skilled Worker  Healthcare Professional  International Graduate  Post-Graduate  Key Selection Factors  Occupation in Demand: Certain occupations that are in high demand in BC receive priority.  Job Offer: A valid job offer from an employer in BC is usually required.  Work Experience: Relevant work experience in the field of the job offer.  Education: Educational qualifications relevant to the job.  Language Proficiency: Proficiency in English or French, usually proven by language test results.  Points-Based System: Candidates are scored based on factors like work experience, education, and language proficiency. Those with higher scores are more likely to receive an invitation.  Benefits of BC PNP  Faster Processing: Provincial nomination can significantly speed up the permanent residence application process.  Priority Processing: BC PNP nominees are given priority in the federal immigration process.  Job Opportunities: Nominees can access job opportunities in BC, which has a robust economy and diverse job market.  Conclusion  The BC PNP draws are a critical pathway for skilled workers and graduates to gain permanent residence in British Columbia. The second draw of July, inviting 71 candidates, highlights the ongoing need for skilled professionals in the province.  […] Read more…
July 9, 2024  In the EU, in 2023, people aged 20-64 years in employment worked 36.1 hours on average per week. This number refers to the hours people actually worked in their main job in the reference week. The average actual working hours per week differ between EU countries (see Map 1). Those with the longest working week were Greece (39.8 hours), Romania (39.5), Poland (39.3) and Bulgaria (39.0). By contrast, the Netherlands had the shortest working week (32.2 hours), followed by Austria (33.6) and Germany (34.0). Employed people by the average actual working hours in a week In the EU, in 2023, 37.1 % of employed people worked on average between 40 and 44.5 hours in a week, whilst only 7.1 % recorded less than 20 actual hours of work per week, in the main job (see Figure 1). The 40-44.5 range of actual working hours represents the largest share in most countries – except for Ireland, Finland, Belgium, France and Denmark, where the greatest share of employed people was for the range of 35-39.5 average worked hours per week. The same range of hours (40 to 44.5) also shows the greatest differences across countries. Indeed, the largest shares were recorded in Bulgaria (82.2 %), Romania (80.2 %) and Latvia (77.7 %). The lowest shares were found in Belgium (16.1 %), France (13.3 %) and Denmark (10.6 %). […] Read more…
July 5, 2024On July 3, 2024, British Columbia issued 77 invitations through the BC Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP) Tech draw. This draw focused on attracting skilled workers and international graduates in the technology sector, which is a critical area for the province’s economic growth and innovation.     Streams and Requirements     The 77 invitations were distributed across four streams under the BC PNP:  Skilled Worker (SI) International Graduate (SI) Skilled Worker (EEBC) International Graduate (EEBC)    SI (Skills Immigration) and EEBC (Express Entry BC) are the two main pathways through which candidates can apply:  SI Stream: For workers with skills, experience, and qualifications needed by B.C. employers.  EEBC Stream: Linked with the federal Express Entry system, which fast-tracks the immigration process for skilled workers.     Minimum Scores and Eligibility  Minimum Scores: For this draw, the minimum scores across all streams were 75 points.  Eligibility Criteria: To be eligible for the Tech draw, candidates typically need a job offer in one of the priority tech occupations, and they must meet the specific requirements of the BC PNP, which include having relevant work experience, language proficiency, and an intention to reside in British Columbia.     Priority Tech Occupations  The BC PNP Tech draws target specific occupations in the tech sector. Some of these priority occupations include:  – Software engineers and designers  – Web developers and programmers  – Computer network technicians  – Data scientists  – Cybersecurity specialists     The BC PNP Tech draws are part of a broader strategy to address labor shortages in the technology sector and support the province’s economic growth by attracting highly skilled professionals.  […] Read more…
July 5, 2024The latest Express Entry draw for Canada took place on July 2, 2024. This draw issued 920 invitations to apply (ITAs) for permanent residency under the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP). The minimum Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score required for this draw was 739. This score includes the additional 600 points awarded for having a provincial nomination, indicating that the base CRS score for invited candidates was around 139 points.     The details of the draw are as follows:     Number of invitations issued: 920  CRS score of lowest-ranked candidate invited: 739  Date and time of round: July 2, 2024, at 15:12:05 UTC  Tie-breaking rule: February 2, 2024, at 11:38:43 UTC.     This draw is part of the regular series of draws conducted by the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to invite skilled workers to apply for permanent residency. The Express Entry system manages applications for three economic immigration programs: the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, and the Canadian Experience Class. Candidates in the Express Entry pool are ranked based on their CRS score, which considers factors such as age, education, work experience, and language proficiency.     Recent draws in 2024 have included various program-specific and general draws. For example, earlier draws in June included a PNP draw on June 19 with 1,499 invitations and a CRS cutoff of 663, and a Canadian Experience Class (CEC) draw on May 31 with 3,000 invitations and a CRS cutoff of 522. The pattern of issuing ITAs varies, with some draws targeting specific categories like healthcare, STEM occupations, and French-speaking candidates.     Candidates who receive an ITA have 60 days to submit a complete application for permanent residency, providing detailed documentation to support their profile and CRS score. The IRCC aims to process most applications within six months from the date of submission.  […] Read more…
July 2, 2024Starting today, July 1st, 2024; Australia has introduced significant changes in the Student Visa application process. First of all, now you need to apply for a student visa while residing outside Australia. You won’t be allowed to apply for a student visa while residing in the country. As per the new rule, even Visitors and Temporary Graduate visa holders won’t be permitted to apply for student visas during their stay in Australia. However, those who have already applied for a student visa before 1st of July, won’t be affected by the new rules. The government of the Asia-Pacific region has even decided to increase the student visa application fees. The report is that student visas are going to be now AUS$1,600 from 1st July 2024. Earlier it was AUS$710. You can have a look at the table. Date Student Visa Application Fee (AUD) Student Visa Application Fee (INR) From 1st July, 2024 AUS$1,600 88,000INR Up to 30th June, 2024 AUS$710 39,703INR * As per 1st July, 2024 The Australian government has revised the fee schedule for the Student visa (subclass 500) and will now charge AUS$1,445 for each accompanying applicant who is at least 18 years old and AUS$390 for those who are younger. Age AUD INR Accompanying Applicant Aged 18 + AUS$1,445 80,805INR Accompanying Applicant Aged Under 18 AUS$390 21,809INR * As per 1st July, 2024 This is the overall story of how the Government of Australia has implemented changes in student visa rules. […] Read more…
June 29, 2024British Columbia’s International Credentials Recognition Act, set to come into effect on July 1, represents a significant policy initiative aimed at improving the recognition of foreign qualifications and credentials. This legislation seeks to address the longstanding challenges faced by internationally trained professionals in having their credentials recognized, thus enabling them to integrate more effectively into the workforce. Historically, many skilled immigrants have encountered barriers when attempting to have their foreign education, training, and professional experience acknowledged in British Columbia. These obstacles often result in underemployment, where highly qualified individuals are unable to work in their respective fields, leading to a waste of talent and potential. The International Credentials Recognition Act aims to mitigate these issues by establishing a more streamlined and transparent process for credential recognition. Key components of the act include: 1. Standardized Assessment Processes: The act will introduce standardized processes for evaluating and recognizing international credentials. This means that the criteria and procedures for recognition will be consistent, reducing uncertainty and variability in the assessment outcomes. 2. Improved Transparency and Communication: There will be clearer guidelines and better communication regarding the requirements and steps involved in the recognition process. This will help internationally trained professionals understand what is needed and what they can expect. 3. Support for Regulatory Bodies: The act will provide support to professional regulatory bodies to enhance their capacity to assess international credentials more efficiently. This includes resources for developing better assessment tools and training for those involved in the recognition process. 4. Timely Decision-Making: The legislation mandates that credential assessments be completed within a reasonable timeframe, ensuring that applicants are not left in limbo for extended periods. 5. Appeals Process: An appeals mechanism will be established for those who wish to challenge a decision regarding the recognition of their credentials. This adds a layer of fairness and accountability to the process. By implementing these measures, the International Credentials Recognition Act aims to unlock the potential of internationally trained professionals, allowing them to contribute fully to the economy and society. This is expected to benefit not only the individuals concerned but also the broader community by addressing skills shortages and enhancing the diversity of the workforce. In summary, the International Credentials Recognition Act is a progressive step towards creating a more inclusive and efficient system for the recognition of foreign credentials in British Columbia. By reducing barriers to employment for skilled immigrants, the province hopes to harness their talents and improve economic outcomes for all. […] Read more…
June 29, 2024In the latest Quebec draw, held on June 20, 2024, a total of 1,470 candidates were invited to apply for permanent residency. This draw saw a minimum score requirement of 585 points, marking a notable decrease from prior draws, which typically had higher cut-off scores. For example, the draw on June 6, 2024, required a minimum score of 587, and the draw on May 30, 2024, had a cut-off score of 591.  This draw is part of Quebec’s Regular Skilled Worker Program (RSWP), which selects candidates based on a variety of criteria, including language proficiency, job offers, and work experience. The program emphasizes French language proficiency and often prioritizes candidates with job offers outside the Montreal Metropolitan Community.  The trend of lowering the minimum score in Quebec’s draws reflects the province’s intention to broaden the pool of eligible candidates, thereby attracting a diverse range of skilled workers. This approach aligns with Quebec’s ongoing efforts to address labor market needs and promote economic growth in different regions of the province.  The Arrima system, which Quebec uses for these draws, is designed to manage the intake of skilled worker applications more efficiently. Candidates submit an expression of interest, and those who meet the specific criteria set for each draw are invited to apply for a Certificate de selection du Québec (CSQ), a crucial step towards obtaining permanent residency in Quebec.  In the broader context, Quebec has been active in issuing invitations throughout 2024. For instance, earlier draws in the year included:  June 6, 2024: 1,281 invitations with a minimum score of 587.  May 30, 2024: 1,441 invitations with a minimum score of 591.  May 23, 2024: 1,350 invitations with a minimum score of 593 Each of these draws underscores Quebec’s strategy to regularly invite skilled workers and address specific labor market demands by adjusting the score thresholds and targeting different occupational groups. The regularity and frequency of these draws, often bi-weekly, indicate Quebec’s commitment to maintaining a robust immigration pipeline that aligns with the province’s economic and demographic objectives. […] Read more…
June 25, 2024Starting 1 July 2024, holders of certain visas, including Visitor and Temporary Graduate visas, will no longer be able to apply for Student visas while in Australia. Student visa applicants with a genuine intention to pursue studies in Australia will still be able to apply for a Student visa from offshore (outside of Australia). What you need to know Key details of the new regulations include: Visitor visa holders (Subclass 600), Temporary Graduate visa holders (Subclass 485) and other specified visa holders (see below) cannot apply for Student visas while they are in Australia. Temporary graduates should depart Australia at the end of their visa or consider job opportunities that might lead to employer-sponsored visas or permanent residency if they want to remain in Australia. Holders of Working Holiday Maker (Subclass 417) and Work and Holiday (Subclass 462) visas are not affected. Student visa applications lodged in Australia before 1 July 2024 are not affected by this change and will be processed. You can apply for your Student visa offshore and travel to Australia to wait for the outcome of your visa application. However, you need to hold or be granted a visa that allows you to enter and remain in Australia for that time. You should ensure you comply with any conditions attached to your visa, including work and study limitations. Offshore Student visa applicants cannot get a Bridging visa to stay in Australia while waiting for their application to be processed. Visitor visa holders may continue to study for up to three months while holding their visa. Those intending to study for periods longer than three months will need to apply for a Student visa outside Australia. Which visas does this apply to? Temporary Graduate, Maritime Crew and Visitor visa holders can no longer apply for a Student visa while onshore in Australia. These are the specific visa subclasses that are impacted: Subclass 485 (Temporary Graduate) Subclass 600 (Visitor) Subclass 601 (Electronic Travel Authority) Subclass 602 (Medical Treatment) Subclass 651 (eVisitor) Subclass 988 (Maritime Crew) This is in addition to the following visas. It is already not possible to make a valid Student application from these visa types: Subclass 403 (Temporary Work) International Relations)) – Domestic Worker (Diplomatic or Consular) stream Subclass 426 (Domestic Worker (Temporary) – Diplomatic or Consular) Subclass 771 (Transit) Subclass 995 (Diplomatic Temporary) – primary visa holders only Why is this change taking place? This measure is in response to the trend of ‘permanent temporariness,’ where individuals who may not meet the eligibility criteria for permanent residency extend their stay through multiple visa applications. This is part of a package of reforms, released as part of the Australian Government’s Migration Strategy. The reforms aim to maintain the integrity of the international education system and support genuine students. These changes demonstrate the Australian Government’s commitment to supporting genuine students while closing loopholes that compromise the system’s integrity. […] Read more…
June 25, 2024The last Manitoba PNP draw took place on June 21, 2024. This draw offered a total of 163 invitations issued to International Education Stream and Skilled Worker Overseas candidates with a minimum score of 721.  The Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP) regularly searches the IRCC’s Express Entry pool to find candidates who may meet the criteria of one of Manitoba’s Express Entry immigration streams. To qualify under a Provincial Nominee Program, Manitoba must nominate the applicant. The MPNP collects individuals from the Express Entry Pool to personally invite them to live and work in Manitoba.  June 21, 2024 Draw  On June 21, 2024, Manitoba conducted a draw, issuing a total of 163 invitations. The details are as follows:  International Education Stream:  Number of Invitations: 111  Minimum Score Required: Not specified  Skilled Worker Overseas:  Number of Invitations: 52  Minimum Score Required: 721  […] Read more…
June 20, 2024The most recent Express Entry draw conducted by Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) invited 1,499 candidates to apply for permanent residency. The Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) cut-off score for this draw was 663 points. The Express Entry system is a popular immigration pathway for skilled workers who wish to move to Canada. Candidates are ranked based on various factors, including age, education, work experience, and language proficiency. Those with the highest scores are invited to apply for permanent residency during regular draws. A CRS cut-off score of 663 indicates a competitive selection process, as candidates must have high qualifications and credentials to meet or exceed this threshold. Invitations to apply are extended to candidates across three main economic immigration programs: the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, and the Canadian Experience Class. For individuals seeking to improve their CRS score, common strategies include gaining additional work experience, pursuing further education, improving language test scores, and securing a job offer in Canada, among others. Key Points: Number of Invitations: 1,499 candidates were invited to apply for permanent residence. CRS Cut-off: The minimum CRS score required was 663. […] Read more…

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